Hyundai Ioniq Electric

Base MSRP: From $30,315
Configurations:

  • Electric – From $30,315
  • Limited- From $36,815

Destination Charge: $920
Tax Credit: up to $7,500

EPA Range: 124-150 miles, pure electric
Battery: 28 kWh lithium-ion polymer
Charging Acceptance Rate: 6.6 kW
Dimensions: 176″ L x 72″ W x 57″ H

Reviews of the Hyundai Ioniq Electric

Overview

Performance: Electric vehicle (EV); 88 kilowats, 118 horsepower
Mileage estimate: Equivalent of 122-150 mpg

Price estimate: $30,315 to $36,815

Warranty: 5 years / 60,000 miles
Drivetrain warranty: 10 years / 100,000 miles
Roadside assistance: 5 years / unlimited miles
Corrosion warranty: 7 years / unlimited miles

(2019) Looking for a capable electric vehicle at a reasonable price?  The 2019 Hyundai Ioniq Electric is certainly worth a look.

Heading into the summer months, the Ioniq Electric just happens to be the most inexpensive compact four-door EV on the market, starting at around $30,400. And federal and state rebate incentives drop that sticker price to an even more enticing figure.

The front-wheel drive Ioniq Electric is offered in a hatchback body style and has two trims. The Base model is well-equipped, but the more expensive Limited version naturally adds more extras. There are no major changes for the 2019 Ioniq EV, which was originally introduced in 2017.

Anyone interested in purchasing the 2019 Hyundai Ioniq better be proficient at decision making. That’s required, because the Ioniq comes in three distinct models – and all three of them are appealing. The Ioniq is the first vehicle worldwide that’s available with three different types of electrified powertrains on the same platform.

For forward-thinking folks who want to travel via EV mode only, the Ioniq Electric is quite tempting. But not so fast on that decision. Hyundai also offers the Ioniq Hybrid and the Ioniq plug-in hybrid (PHEV). Regardless of which model is chosen, what car buyers will be getting is a premium compact vehicle that has a sporty exterior, is extremely fuel efficient, and can be driven off the dealer’s lot for a reasonable price.

At first glance, the Electric and Hybrid models appear the same. But look a little closer and one can see the difference: the grille is sealed off in the Ioniq Electric, replaced by a glossy black panel that blends in well with the exterior design. The reasoning makes sense: the EV model has no radiator because there’s no engine. All Ioniq models have a have a flat roofline that was designed to get maximum aerodynamics.

Ioniq Electric vehicles have a 28-kWh lithium-ion battery pack that is located beneath the rear seat. It travels 124 miles on a charge, which is less than some of its competitors. Using a Level 3 DC fast charger, the Ioniq can reach 80 percent of its charge within 23 minutes. A full recharge from a 240-volt charger takes about 4.5 hours.

Reportedly, the 2020 Ioniq EV battery will be more than one-third larger at 38.3 kWh, meaning drivers can go even further between charges. For the first owner, Hyundai provides an unlimited battery warranty in case of failure.

The Ioniq has an 88-kW electric motor that generates 118 horsepower and 218 pound-feet of torque. We didn’t feel like the Ioniq was lacking performance. Although not quick off the line, it delivers well in freeway passing situations and can climb steep hills adequately. It goes approximately 0-60 mph in 8.9 seconds; not bad for the segment. The Ioniq EV gets an impressive 122-150 mpge.

All Ioniq models deliver solid handling, accurate steering and maneuver well in tight spaces. Unlike the Hybrid model, the Ioniq EV doesn’t have a sport mode that enhances the driving experience.

The Ioniq interior is fairly roomy for a compact vehicle, offering both solid head and leg space up front, where it’s capable of accommodating people of all sizes. Yet the same can’t be said for the back seat where three people is definitely a crowd. The cargo area measures 23.8 cubic feet and the 60/40 rear seats fold down nearly flat, greatly enhancing the hauling capability.

The interior layout is smartly designed and most people will enjoy the intuitive controls and the overall technology. The Base model comes with a 7-inch touchscreen, Bluetooth, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration.

Despite its appeal, the Hyundai Ioniq EV has not been a big seller. Other than its unimpressive range of 124 miles, it fills the need of many conscientious car buyers seeking an EV. Gas mileage is terrific for this capable compact that comes with an alluring price tag.

— J.W.

Versatile Hyundai Ioniq: One car, three options (2017)

Anyone interested in purchasing the all-new 2017 Hyundai Ioniq better be proficient at decision making. That’s required, because the Ioniq comes in three models – and all three of them are appealing.

For forward-thinking folks who want to travel via electric vehicle (EV) only, the Ioniq Electric is quite tempting. But not so fast on that decision. Hyundai also offers the Ioniq Hybrid and the Ioniq plug-in hybrid. Regardless of which model is chosen, what car buyers will be getting is a premium compact vehicle that has a sporty exterior, is extremely fuel efficient, and can be driven off the dealer’s lot for a reasonable price.

If purchased in California, the Ioniq Electric costs approximately $20,300 after rebates, which is quite the savings from a roughly $30,300 price tag.

Regarding price, Hyundai is offering what it calls a subscription program, which in reality is a lease. The cost for the 24- to 36-month plan is between $275 to $365 per month, depending on trim model. There’s a $2,500 amount due at purchase, but that’s offset by the California Clean Vehicle Rebate ($2,500 for most applicants). The “subscription” features free scheduled maintenance, unlimited mileage, and free replacement for items like brake pads, windshield wipers and tires. There’s also reimbursement for charging costs for the initial 50,000 miles.

At first glance, the Electric and Hybrid models appear the same. But look a little closer and one can see the difference: the grille is sealed off in the Ioniq Electric. The reasoning makes sense: the EV model has no radiator because there’s no engine. All Ioniq models have a have a flat roofline that was done to get the maximum in aerodynamics.

The Ioniq Electric is battery-powered and has a 124-mile range. While that distance is nothing shabby, it can’t compete with the Chevy Bolt’s 238-mile range before recharging is required. Yet the Ioniq will still go further than most EV’s without needing a charge. The Ioniq’s fuel economy is equivalent to 122-150 mpg.

All Ioniq Electric vehicles have an 88 kilowatt (kW) lithium-ion pack that is located beneath the rear seat. Typical charging time is 4.5 hours, using the standard 240-volt EV charger that many owners install at their homes.

The EV motor generates 118 horsepower and 215 pound-feet of torque. We didn’t feel like the EV was lacking performance. Although not quick off the line, it delivers well in freeway passing situations and can climb steep hills adequately. Unlike the Hybrid model, the EV version doesn’t have a sport mode that enhances the driving experience. All Ioniq models deliver solid handling and accurate steering.

One of the most notable qualities of the Ioniq Hybrid is gas mileage – it gets between 54-59 mpg. That’s better than the Toyota Prius. Note that the Hybrid plug-in model will go 27 miles via electric power only.

The Hybrid and the plug-in both have a 1.6-liter, four-cylinder engine that delivers a combined 139 horsepower and 125 pound-feet of torque. It’s a little quicker than the EV model and shouldn’t leave most drivers muttering about the lack of performance. We did notice the Ioniq has more than typical road noise and rear visibility is an issue due to a short rear window.

The Ioniq interior is fairly roomy for a compact vehicle, offering both solid head and leg space up front and decent room for back seat occupants. The interior layout is smartly designed and most people will enjoy the intuitive controls and the overall technology. The trunk space is 23.8 cubic-foot, more room than many other EV-Hybrid vehicles.

Hyundai could have a major hit with the 2017 Ioniq. It fills the need of many conscientious car buyers who are not timid about experimenting with an Electric or a Hybrid model equipped with some EV capability. Gas mileage is terrific for this capable compact that comes with an alluring price tag.

— J.W.

Interested in Hyundai PHEV options? Check out their lineup here!

Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid

Hyundai Sonata Plug-In Hybrid

Check out Hyundai’s 2019 Model manufacturer details on this vehicle here: www.hyundaiusa.com

Recommended Power Level of Charging Station for Hyundai Ioniq = 32A

Vehicle Acceptance rate: 6.6kW

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