Hyundai Ioniq Electric

Base MSRP: From $33,045
Configurations:

  • SE – From $33,045
  • Limited- From $38,615

Destination Charge: $995
Tax Credit: up to $7,500

EPA Range: 170 miles, pure electric
Battery: 28 kWh lithium-ion polymer
Charging Acceptance Rate: 6.6 kW
Dimensions: 176″ L x 72″ W x 57″ H

Reviews of the Hyundai Ioniq Electric

Overview

Performance: 101-kW electric motor, 134 horsepower
Mileage estimate: Equivalent of 121-145 mpge

Price estimate: $26,540 to $32,110

Warranty: 5 years / 60,000 miles
Drivetrain warranty: 10 years / 100,000 miles
Roadside assistance: 5 years / unlimited miles
Corrosion warranty: 7 years / unlimited miles

2020 Hyundai Ioniq

Intro

When it comes to electric vehicles, the first name that comes to mind is definitely Tesla. The quality of Tesla EVs has given the company an enviable reputation that honestly no one else can touch as we move forward in 2020.

But when it comes to the next level of EV vehicles, Hyundai is certainly in the discussion. The South Korean auto manufacturer has two well-received EVs in the Ionic and the Kona. And it will reportedly invest more than $87 billion to produce 23 EVs by 2025.

Introduced in 2017, the Ioniq EV has been on a nice sales path. Sales figures have climbed each year, starting at 11,197 and stretching to 19,574 for 2019. And if the Coronavirus pandemic doesn’t impede sales drastically, the 2020 Hyundai Ioniq EV is expected to break the 20,000 barrier.

This year’s Ioniq has been refreshed and has significant improvements to range, horsepower and standard equipment. It should be noted that the sticker price jumped as well, approximately $2,600, yet the Ioniq is still under $34,000. More good news is the California price tag for the Ionic EV is greatly reduced (by $10,000) due to a state rebate of $2,500 and a federal tax credit of $7,500.

Price remains a major plus for the Hyundai Ioniq, as does the increase in range. Previous models of the Ioniq EV have a range of 124 miles but the new 2020 Ioniq electric vehicle has a range of 170 miles, pushing the Ioniq into a higher tier in the EV range segment. Its competitors that have more range come with a more expensive price tag, and the cars that are similarly priced to the Ioniq have less range.

Power and Speed

The increase in the Ioniq’s range is due to a larger battery pack, previously at 28 kWh and now 38.3 kWh, which has also led to a bump in horsepower. The electric motor is larger as well (101-kW), hiking the horsepower from 118 up to 134. Despite the increases, the one major strike against the Ioniq EV remains its lackluster acceleration.

Comparing PHEV/BEV

Take note that the Ioniq comes in three electrified fuel configurations. If you want to travel only using an electric mode, the pure Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) is the right fit. If you want to be able to use a gasoline powered engine as a reserve, the Ioniq plug-in hybrid (PHEV) is the best match. If you are considering a hybrid, make sure to purchase the plug-in hybrid as the “Ioniq Hybrid” does not allow for charging outside of what the petroleum powered engine charges, which doesn’t save much use of gasoline.

Charging

An additional plus for EV buyers is this year’s improved charging. Hyundai says that the new battery can recharge to 80 percent in just 54 minutes at a 100-kW fast-charging station. And the onboard charger has gotten better as well, going from a 6.6-kW unit to 7.2 kW. Using a regular 120-volt outlet, the Ionic can totally recharge in nine hours. When using a Level 2 charging station the Ioniq BEV can charge from completely empty to full in just four hours.

Performance

All Ioniq models deliver solid handling, accurate steering and maneuver well in tight spaces. Unlike the Hybrid model, the Ioniq EV doesn’t have a sport mode that enhances the driving experience. The EV does offer regenerative braking, so drivers can mostly use one pedal when coming to a stop and recuperate some power (meaning more mileage range).

In the safety department, the Ioniq EV has a standard driver assist package that includes forward-collision warning, pedestrian detection and lane-keeping assist.

Interior Space

The Ioniq interior is fairly roomy for a compact vehicle, offering both solid head and leg space up front, accommodating people of all sizes. Yet the same can’t be said for the back seat where three people is definitely a crowd. The cargo area measures 23 cubic feet and the 60/40 rear seats fold down nearly flat, greatly enhancing the hauling capability.

The interior layout is smartly designed and most people will enjoy the intuitive controls and the overall technology. The SE base model has a little larger 8-inch touchscreen this year and comes standard with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto capability. The upgraded Limited model comes with a 10.25-inch touchscreen and a Harman Kardon premium audio system.

Conclusion

Regardless of which model is chosen, what car buyers will be getting from the Hyundai Ioniq is a premium compact hatchback that has a sporty exterior, is extremely fuel efficient, and can be driven off the dealer’s lot for a reasonable price.

— J.W.

We liked the Ionic EV in the past and this year’s version is far better, thanks primarily to increasing range and lowering charging time. This green machine has $10,000 available in rebates and also features a terrific warranty. So, what’s not to like about the Hyundai Ioniq when looking for a capable electric vehicle at a reasonable price? 

The PowerCharge, Siemens Versicharge, and the ClipperCreek HCS-40 are a few suitable EV charging stations for the Hyundai Ioniq.

Recommended Power Level of Charging Station for Hyundai Ioniq = 32A

Vehicle Acceptance rate: 6.6kW

Interested in Hyundai PHEV options? Check out the Hyundai Sonata Plug-In Hybrid and the Hyundai IONIQ Plug-in Hybrid

Interested in other Hyundai BEV options? Check out the Hyundai Kona here!

For more manufacturer details on this vehicle visit: www.hyundaiusa.com

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The 2019 Hyundai Ioniq Electric

Heading into the summer months, the Ioniq Electric just happens to be the most inexpensive compact four-door EV on the market, starting at around $30,400. Federal and state rebate incentives drop that sticker price to an even more enticing figure.

The front-wheel drive Ioniq Electric is offered in a hatchback body style and has two trims. The Base model is well-equipped, but the more expensive Limited version naturally adds more extras. There are no major changes for the 2019 Ioniq EV, which was originally introduced in 2017.

At first glance, the Electric and Hybrid models appear the same. But look a little closer and one can see the difference: the grille is sealed off in the Ioniq Electric, replaced by a glossy black panel that blends in well with the exterior design. The reasoning makes sense: the EV model has no radiator because there’s no engine. All Ioniq models have a have a flat roofline that was designed to get maximum aerodynamics.

Ioniq Electric vehicles have a 28-kWh lithium-ion battery pack that is located beneath the rear seat. It travels 124 miles on a charge, which is less than some of its competitors. Using a Level 3 DC fast charger, the Ioniq can reach 80 percent of its charge within 23 minutes. A full recharge from a 240-volt charger takes about 4.5 hours.

Reportedly, the 2020 Ioniq EV battery will be more than one-third larger at 38.3 kWh, meaning drivers can go even further between charges. For the first owner, Hyundai provides an unlimited battery warranty in case of failure.

The Ioniq has an 88-kW electric motor that generates 118 horsepower and 218 pound-feet of torque. We didn’t feel like the Ioniq was lacking performance. Although not quick off the line, it delivers well in freeway passing situations and can climb steep hills adequately. It goes approximately 0-60 mph in 8.9 seconds; not bad for the segment. The Ioniq EV gets an impressive 122-150 mpge.

All Ioniq models deliver solid handling, accurate steering and maneuver well in tight spaces. Unlike the Hybrid model, the Ioniq EV doesn’t have a sport mode that enhances the driving experience.

The Ioniq interior is fairly roomy for a compact vehicle, offering both solid head and leg space up front, where it’s capable of accommodating people of all sizes. Yet the same can’t be said for the back seat where three people is definitely a crowd. The cargo area measures 23.8 cubic feet and the 60/40 rear seats fold down nearly flat, greatly enhancing the hauling capability.

The interior layout is smartly designed and most people will enjoy the intuitive controls and the overall technology. The Base model comes with a 7-inch touchscreen, Bluetooth, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration.

Despite its appeal, the Hyundai Ioniq EV has not been a big seller. Other than its unimpressive range of 124 miles, it fills the need of many conscientious car buyers seeking an EV. Gas mileage is terrific for this capable compact that comes with an alluring price tag.

–  J.W.

The Versatile Hyundai Ioniq 2017

Hyundai is offering what it calls a subscription program, which in reality is a lease. The cost for the 24 to 36-month plan is between $275 to $365 per month, depending on trim model. There’s a $2,500 amount due at purchase, but that’s offset by the California Clean Vehicle Rebate ($2,500 for most applicants). The “subscription” features free scheduled maintenance, unlimited mileage, and free replacement for items like brake pads, windshield wipers and tires. There’s also reimbursement for charging costs for the initial 50,000 miles.

At first glance, the Electric and Hybrid models appear the same. But look a little closer and one can see the difference: the grille is sealed off in the Ioniq Electric. The reasoning makes sense: the EV model has no radiator because there’s no engine. All Ioniq models have a have a flat roofline that was done to get the maximum in aerodynamics.

The Ioniq Electric is battery-powered and has a 124-mile range. While that distance is nothing shabby, it can’t compete with the Chevy Bolt’s 238-mile range before recharging is required. Yet the Ioniq will still go further than most EVs in today’s market without needing a charge. The Ioniq’s fuel economy is equivalent to 122-150 mpg.

All Ioniq Electric vehicles have an 88 kilowatt (kW) lithium-ion pack that is located beneath the rear seat. Typical charging time is 4.5 hours, using the standard 240-volt EV charger that many owners install at their homes.

The EV motor generates 118 horsepower and 215 pound-feet of torque. Although not quick off the line, it delivers well in freeway passing situations and can climb steep hills adequately. Unlike the Hybrid model, the EV version doesn’t have a sport mode that enhances the driving experience. All Ioniq models deliver solid handling and accurate steering.

One of the most notable qualities of the Ioniq Hybrid is gas mileage – it gets between 54-59 mpg. That’s better than the Toyota Prius. Note that the Hybrid plug-in model will go 27 miles via electric power only.

The Hybrid and the plug-in both have a 1.6-liter, four-cylinder engine that delivers a combined 139 horsepower and 125 pound-feet of torque. It’s a little quicker than the EV model and shouldn’t leave most drivers muttering about the lack of performance. We did notice the Ioniq has more than typical road noise and rear visibility is an issue due to a short rear window.

Hyundai could have a major hit with the 2017 Ioniq. It fills the need of many conscientious car buyers who are not timid about experimenting with an Electric or a Hybrid model equipped with some EV capability with an alluring price tag.

–  J.W.

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